Overhauling Judi’s Freewheel + updates

While I was working in the attic with Ezra he noticed that Judi was quite rusty in parts, mainly because I put her away without properly scrubbing everything down. And so I took apart her drivetrain and he helped me scrub. But when I went to reassemble the rear wheel I noticed that it felt a little loose and wobbly. The middle gears had felt a little strange when riding lately, and that explains it. So I took apart the freewheel and overhauled it. Now it is running smoothly.

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Wow! I discovered this post in my drafts. Seems like I wrote it (mostly) and then forgot about it for…shit, like, half a year. So there ya go. I had put Judi away for the winter a little earlier than usual since she had developed a flatting problem. It turned out that I had some crushed glass in the front wheel, so I assumed that was the problem. I ended up getting new tires, the same Paselas but with the extra bit of flat resistance. When the weather got good I put the new tires on with new tubes. I pumped up the first one, set it aside, and as I turned to the rear wheel I heard that damned “pfffffffffftttttsssssssssssss…” I won’t lie, I got unreasonably upset by this. But at that point I said fuck it and I went ahead and pumped up the rear tire. I had originally planned to just ride the bike to work the next morning, but since it was getting late and I had to wake up at 4:30 in the morning I decided to just deal with the front tire the following afternoon.

But of course when I got home from work the next day I found that both tires were flat. Since I had already gotten unreasonably mad the day before, in fact within the last 12 hours, I decided to stay calm and treat it like a mystery that I had to solve. A really irritating mystery. It seemed that all the punctures were now coming from the inside, so the first thing I did was to very carefully go over all of the spokes to see if anything was poking up. I also looked and felt along every millimeter of the rim for any rough spots, and did end up sanding down a couple of questionable areas, though I don’t know if that was actually necessary. I then replaced the front tube again and followed through till it was pumped up to 80psi. While I was just starting to futz with the other wheel, satisfied in a job well done (that’s not true, I actually sat there with my eyes fixed on the front wheel just waiting for something to go wrong) the tire went flat. I can’t say how mad I got at this point because I blacked out. But when I came to later I discovered that I had angrily, but successfully, removed the tires and tubes from the rims and found the new punctures, also located along the inside of the tubes.

At this point I called my friends at the gear hub to see if they had any advice on what else I should check. They suggested that it might be the rim strips and that perhaps new ones made out of cloth would work better. Luckily they had those so I ran over and grabbed a pair. When I got home later I used alcohol to clean the inside of the rims thoroughly, then I carefully applied the new strips. When the time came to assemble everything again I decided to try an experiment. Some of the tubes got punctures also along the side wall where the tube itself had a seam. I was worrying that perhaps I was using cheap tubes and that this was part of my problem. I had gotten a set of 10 made by Avenir but they seemed less stretchy and relatively brittle compared to the Kendas that I had had in the tires originally. So I used yet another new tube in the front but in the back I just use a patched up Kenda tube that had originally been in that tire before all of the flatting began. At this point it’s been a couple of months and I have not had any issues with the tires. But during the first week after all of this business I was very careful riding on them and always had a new tube and a patch kit on me. Though I should probably do that all the time anyway.

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It’s Bike Swap time again!

The Great Maine Bike Swap is coming up soon! On Sunday, April 22 at 10am the doors of the Sullivan Center gym will open and folks will be allowed to peruse thousands of bikes being sold by Mainers. Every sale will benefit the Bicycle Coalition of Maine, too. There will be opportunities to test ride bikes on site, and there will be helmets to use and mechanics on hand to verify the bike’s safety before you try it out.

This event is always fun and exciting, and it’s such a great opportunity to get ready for the good riding weather. Plus this year you can grab your bike at the Swap, then ride it over to Standard Baking Co where the Portland Gear Hub will have a table set up to do quick tune ups and inspections while you sip coffee, eat pastries, and ask any questions you might have. What a way to get your bike sorted out!

And the Gear Hub itself will be having its annual yard sale that day (and the day before) so be sure to stop by and pick up anything you might still need for your new bike, your upcoming camping trips, or perhaps your upcoming bikepacking adventure.

Basically the weekend of the 20th will be jam packed full of fun bicycle happenings. I hope to see you there.

http://www.bikemaine.org/maine-swap

http://portlandgearhub.org/events-calendar/

Winter Alley Cat – January 28th!

Just a heads up that we are having a winter alley cat race this month, Sunday the 28th. It begins at noon in Monument Square, and it ends somewhere else where we can all party hearty well into the afternoon. This race will replace the annual Snowman Adventure Race that the Gear Hub has been hosting the past three or four years, but it will involve a fair amount of outdoor winter activities.

If you’ve never been a part of an alley cat it’s a kind of bike race/scavenger hunt with no set route. Instead there’s a list of stops around town that you have to hit in order to get a stamp before making it to the final stop. They’re always fun, and there are prizes for the normal race categories as well as best costume (encouraged, not required), bonus points, dead last, etc. I highly recommend showing up for these events when we put them on. You can race individually or in teams of up to six people, so drag some friends along.

I hope to see some of you fine folks there!

The Landlord’s Nishiki

   My landlord lives downstairs from me, and a few days ago he sent me a text stating that he had locked his bike up out front and that he’d be willing to pay me to fix it up for him. I had mentioned that it’s something I do on the side, so it came as no real surprise, and I’m always happy to help get my fellow Portlanders on bicycles.

   I went down to find a black Nishiki Blazer mountain bike. He had given me the code to his lock, so I took it upstairs and gave it a once over before heading off to work. The left shift lever had snapped off and would need replacing, along with both shift cables. The front hub had some play in it. The drivetrain was dirty and the freewheel seemed to stick a bit. So it needed some work, but it seemed to be mostly in order.


   The following day I removed the broken shift lever and ran down to the Gear Hub with ten minutes until closing time, as is my way.  Kyle dumped out a bucket of old shifters and I sat on the floor sifting through them until I found a perfect match just waiting to come home with me and get back to doing what it does best.  I paid my three dollars and went home to install the lever and cables and test that part out.  Turns out it worked perfectly.


   The day after that I came home from work and made it my goal to finish the bike first thing.  I took it outside and put it in the bike stand for a thorough scrubbing.  I cleaned up the drivetrain first since that always makes such a mess of the rest of the bike (not a lesson I learned properly on my first, or even second time cleaning a bicycle), then gave it a good head-tube-to-toe-clip washing.  The rear derailleur was definitely gunked up a bit, but it was far from the worst I’ve come across.  There was some surface rust on many parts of the drivetrain, so I hit it with a brass brush, also making sure to spot-scrub any nuts and bolts that bore tarnish elsewhere.  I finished up, dried the bike off, and got it into the attic workshop just as it started raining.



   I put on some podcasts (mainly running through the Civics 101 shows from the beginning; highly recommended to my American readers) and got to work on the wheel issues.  I started by removing the freewheel from the rear and flushing it with WD-40.  While gravity was doing its thing I set that aside and overhauled the front hub.  I cleaned it all up and packed it with fresh grease and bearings.  Next I put a medium weight oil into the freewheel and took my time working it in, adding more, working it in, until it was spinning pretty smoothly.  I feel like one of the pawls was still catching just a tiny bit, but only every once in a while, and less so with each addition of oil.  By the time I was ready to grease the threads on the hub and reattach the freewheel it had sorted itself out.    After everything was back together I gave it a quick tune up and moved on to the last job I had to do.



   The rear wheel had a wide-ranging wobble that saw it bumping against the brake pads, first on one side then the other.  I put a drop of oil on each of the spoke nipples and made myself as comfortable as possible since I knew I’d be there for a while.  One of the tools that I have yet to purchase is a truing stand.  The Gear Hub has them available to use during their open bench time hours, but those are limited and I hate the idea of strapping a wheel to my back so I can ride over to the shop just to true it when I could do it almost as well (if perhaps a little slower) in the attic.  I actually just put the wheel on the bike, opened the brakes up wide enough that the rim never touched it, and then started with the most wide ranging adjustments.  Once it started to come into true and I had to do more fine tuning among a smaller range of spokes I would lean my head at a particular angle and watch the reflection of the brake pad in the rim as I slowly spun the wheel.  When the reflection would momentarily grow larger I would mark those few spokes and make my adjustments.  If instead it grew smaller I would make the opposite adjustments.  Eventually I got a consistent reflection and thus trued the wheel.

   And that was it!  I wrote out a note detailing all of the work I had done and I used my wax seal with a bicycle imprint to close up the envelope.  Nerdy?  Yes.  Overkill?  Probably.  But it’s all part of the unique brand of service that I offer!  Am I using the word “unique” in that sweetly derogatory way that some southern ladies might?  Yup.

Schwinn Rear Derailleur Overhaul

I have been working on a late 70s Schwinn Continental that I got from my mom’s friend’s uncle’s cousin, or some such thing. It was a little beat up and it came to me in pieces. I fully disassembled it, did my thang, then finally started to reassemble it. The bike is finished now, but here’s some of the stuff I did. I’ll post a finished pic once I get to test ride it.

The rear derailleur had bearings instead of bushings, which I don’t see too often these days. It was all loose and the jockey wheels were flopping all over the place before, but after a crock pot bath and an overhaul it works great!

My first Campy

I got this Atala from its original owner who bought it in the 70’s and rode it around Portland while they were attending law school at USM. I’m told it’s been ridden around seasonally since then, but I’m thinking it’s been in storage at least the last few years. Lots of surface rust, but so far it doesn’t look like a ton of pitting on the frame. The chrome…well, I haven’t done anything to it yet, so I’m going to try to stay positive until I’ve had a chance to clean it up. The bits and pieces are the only Campy that I’ve come across so far, so it’ll be interesting to finally get the chance to fix some up and see how they work on the road. I’ll have to find a front derailleur to replace the replacement. And I’ve heard good things about the Universal brakes, but have likewise never found any before. Unfortunately, I won’t be able to start working on this bike for a couple months because the Great Maine Bike Swap (http://maineswap.com/event-details/) is coming up and I have many sellable bikes that need fixin’.